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Animal Rehab Institute shared D5 Productions's Trailer Spanische Hofreitschule. ...

Heute um 21:05 Uhr auf ORF III - unsere Doku über die Spanische Hofreitschule <3 Bravo an Isabel Gebhart Jasmin Schwendinger, Alexandra Banitsch, Marie-Thérèse Thiery, Caroline S. Marte, Daniel Lauks, Paul Peraus, Lili Schäfer

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Good explanation

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Animal Rehab Institute shared Chiltern Vet Physio's post. ...

Latest Research Looking at Girth Discomfort in Horses Investigation of Myofascial Trigger Points in Equine Pectoral Muscles and Girth-Aversion Behavior Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, Volume 48, 2017 Abstract Horses displaying aversion to fastening of the girth may be expressing pain from myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). The location of MTrPs in the pectoral region of horses has not been previously described. The objectives of this study were as follows: (1) to locate and map MTrPs in the transverse and ascending pectoral muscles; (2) to score the severity of the MTrPs by behavioral reaction to palpation; and (3) to look for associations between these findings and girth-aversion behavior. Thirty-eight horses were recruited in a cross-sectional clinical study. Taut bands were identified on palpation of horses undergoing physiotherapy assessment and then scored for behavioral reaction to palpation as normal (0), mild (1), moderate (2), or severe (3) and mapped. Owner-reported history of girth-aversion behavior was compared with the severity score using chi-squared analysis. Myofascial trigger points were identified in all horses (average severity: mild n = 6, moderate n = 24, and severe n = 8) with the most common regions of ascending pectoral muscles being the axillary and along the region usually covered by the girth. Horses with an owner-reported history of girth-aversion behavior (n = 13) had higher severity scores than horses without a history of girth-aversion behavior (n = 25; P = .014). Knowledge of the presence and location of MTrPs could assist in the development of prevention and management strategies to improve comfort, optimize performance, and reduce girth-aversion behavior.

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Does your horse have uneven feet ? Is often hypothesized that asymmetric or uneven feet are important enhancing factors for the development of lameness. On a population level, it has been demonstrated that uneven footed horses are retiring earlier from elite level competition, but the biomechanical consequences are not yet known. The objectives of this study were to compare the functional locomotor asymmetries of horses with uneven to those with even feet. In horses with uneven feet, the side with the flatter foot showed a significantly larger maximal horizontal braking and vertical ground reaction force, a larger vertical fetlock displacement and a suppler fetlock spring. The foot with a steeper hoof angle was linearly correlated with an earlier braking-propulsion transition. The conformational differences between both forefeet were more important for loading characteristics than the individual foot conformation of each individual horse. The differences in vertical force and braking force between uneven forefeet could imply either an asymmetrical loading pattern without a pathological component or a subclinical lameness as a result of a pathological development in the steeper foot. Functional Locomotor Consequences of Uneven Forefeet for Trot Symmetry in Individual Riding Horses Nathan Wiggers, Sandra L. P. Nauwelaerts, Sarah Jane Hobbs, Sophie Bool, Claudia F. Wolschrijn,and Willem Back

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We're delighted to have another 2 eminent guest speakers to add to the SRT Conference dream team! We welcome Prof.Lars Roepstorff from Sweden and Prof Renee van Weeren from the Netherlands.More special guests to be announced! #SRT2018 #equinescience #equinewelfare #saddles #riders #horses

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